on rule enforcements or some memorable
22-08-2019, 12:46 PM
Post: #1
Got a question on rule clarification, comments on rule enforcements or some memorable NHL stories? Kerry wants to answer your emails at cmonref@tsn.ca. Kerry, I hope you address Ron MacLeans comment during the second intermission of Game 4 in Montreal-Tampa series. Basically, he suggested that the NHL should not have used a referee from Quebec, following the Game 3 disputed non-goal, because the referee could be biased towards Montreal. Thank you,Bobby Dodd ---- Hi Kerry, On Tuesday, the host of the other playoff broadcaster said that a referee from the area should not have been assigned Game 4 of the Tampa-Montreal series after a controversial call Sunday involving another francophone Quebec referee. Do you agree with that sentiment? Coming off a game like Sundays, should that have been done if it was an official from Ontario for a Leafs game? Or a referee from B.C. for a Canucks game? Jamie Walker Bobby, Jamie and to all Canadians: Ron MacLean offered a very contrite apology for his initial inappropriate comments during a follow-up segment in the Hockey Night In Canada broadcast when he said, "First of all, I want to say Im sorry. Its divisive any time you become about French and English in our country. But I didnt intend to go down that path." We all need to accept Ron MacLeans apology. I have always had the utmost respect for Ron and his sincere apology speaks to the quality of the man more than the personality you see on camera. I know what Ron intended, even though it came out all wrong. There have been many times when the NHL felt the need to alter an officials assignment in an effort to manage a regular season or playoff series based on an incident that took place in a previous game. I called Director of Officiating Bryan Lewis one time when there was a overlap in the assignment process that would have resulted in me working six of seven road games for the Montreal Canadiens. It was just an assignment glitch that was quickly adjusted to avoid overexposure of a referee to one team. Another time, VP of Hockey Ops Brian Burke assigned me as a last-minute addition in a Habs-Flyers game after Lyle Odelein threatened to get Eric Lindros following a fight between the two players in the first game of a home and home series. I was also reassigned to work a return grudge match between Ottawa and the Leafs following a major battle they had a couple of nights earlier in Toronto. In the 2004 Stanley Cup Final between Calgary and Tampa, an initial assignment schedule for the refs was doomed to fail from the very beginning. The referee pairings of Bill McCreary/Stephen Walkom and Brad Watson and I were assigned to work all of our games in the same venue. (Watson and I were assigned to Games 3, 4 and 6 in Calgary while the other crew was in Tampa for 1, 2 and 5). Series traditionally heat up as they progress and it was a suicide mission to have the same refs work in the same venue. Following Game 5 in Tampa a meeting was held in the officials room and I was informed by Colin Campbell and then Director of Officiating Andy Van Hellemond that Brad Watson and I were off Game 6 in Calgary. Nobody informed Brad Watson and he learned of the change the next day at the Denver Airport when Wats overhead members of the media talking about the assignment change as they were connecting onto his flight to Calgary! I returned to work Game 7 in Tampa with Bill McCreary. These kinds of adjustments in the assignment process are reasonable and necessary at times. Ron MacLean, as a referee himself, would certainly understand this type of logic. What Ron should have thought of before he embarked down a self-admitted "divisive" path is that whenever he pulls on his striped jersey, hes no longer from his hometown or even a star television host. In that moment, and in the performance of his duties, Ron is an impartial, unbiased referee that is empowered to place his integrity and that of the game on the line. He cares not what teams are playing or if they are from the town that he lives in. It matters not to Ron what colour their team jerseys are or the crest on the front. It is his duty as a "referee" to perform to the very best of his ability without prejudice or bias. I know that Ron MacLean performs those duties without question every time he pulls on that striped jersey. NHL officials are no different in this regard. When they pull on stripes they are professional people with strong character and integrity. They too perform their duties to the best of their ability and are paid to be impartial. We can criticize an official for a poor call or even our perception of their level of competency. What should never be brought into question is any perceived bias based on where an official might make his home or his family heritage. The referee in Ron MacLean understands these facts as well as I do. Ron - a consummate professional and a man of character and integrity - sincerely apologized for his slip up and brief act of misconduct. As such Ron needs to be forgiven. Time to move forward. Stan Musial Cardinals Jersey . CHAUNCEY BILLUPS (Pistons): Yes they got Josh Smith and Brandon Jennings in the off-season and Andre Drummond is a beast (teams are kicking themselves for passing on him - he rebounds and block shots every game - thats two more discernable and significant skills than most guys in his draft class), but dont for a second discount the impact of having a savvy veteran like Billups on your team. Adam Wainwright Jersey .com) - Al Horford collected 19 points and 16 rebounds and the Atlanta Hawks held off a furious rally to beat the Detroit Pistons 106-103 on Friday night in a game between two of the NBAs hottest teams. http://www.authenticcardinalspro.com/cardinals-paul-dejong-jersey/ . - Vince Wilfork has played only two career games in Kansas City. Keith Hernandez Cardinals Jersey . - Bryan Price sat down in the cushy chair. Paul Goldschmidt Jersey . A broadcast source said the deal is for five years. The agreement calls for a minimum of 17 regular-season games as well as the East and West Division finals being broadcast annually on ESPN, ESPN2 or ESPNEWS. ELKHART LAKE, Wis. -- Tiptoeing at high speed around a rain-slicked track under the pressure of a two-lap overtime, Brendan Gaughan handed away the lead to Chase Elliott. Then he snatched it right back a few corners later. Hed still have two more drivers to hold off on the final lap -- including a last-ditch charge from Alex Tagliani of Lachenaie, Que., the man who appeared to have the race all but won with a little more than a lap left in regulation. Gaughan already had gone sliding off the track a couple of times earlier. Oh, and his team forgot to bring a windshield wiper to install on his car. Through all that, Gaughan held on to win a rainy and wild NASCAR Nationwide Series race at Road America on Saturday. "I love racing in the rain," Gaughan said. "Its fun. And when youre good at it, it makes it even more fun. I havent smelled blood in a long time. Thats been something Ive been lacking lately is that killer attitude. When it started to rain, even without the wiper blade, I started to smell blood and said, Im coming." Gaughan won for the first time in the series, breaking through in his 98th career start. Tagliani was second, followed by Kevin OConnell, Elliott and J.J. Yeley as NASCAR drivers got a rare opportunity to race in the rain. It was the third time in Nationwide history that grooved rain tires have been used in a race; the previous two were in Montreal. NASCAR only uses rain tires on winding road courses, not on oval tracks. The rain added a tense new dimension to racing at Road America, a four-mile road course where the Nationwide Series already had shown an ability to put on a good show. "As we showed today, you can put on a hell of a race in the rain," Gaughan said. After watching his chance to win the race in regullation fizzle out, Tagliani -- who was leading when a late caution came out, ran out of gas and refuelled his car -- nearly charged all the way back to the lead when his crew put him back on slick tires to attack the drying track.dddddddddddd "It was pretty intense," Tagliani said. "The wet was tricky, but obviously we were good. So I dont know. Maybe I threw a bad spell on myself because I was saying, Its impossible that Im going to win this race. Somethings going to happen. On the white flag, something happened." Added Gaughan: "(Give) Tagliani one more lap, the track was dry enough that he would have probably got to us. It worked out in our favour." It was an impressive finish for Elliott, an 18-year-old rookie and the son of NASCAR icon Bill Elliott. But he wasnt exactly patting himself on the back after the race. He missed most of Fridays practice after missing a shift and causing his crew to change engines, briefly slid off the track earlier in Saturdays race, then felt like the threw away a shot at a win. "Failure No. 3 on the weekend for me," Elliott said in a radio interview. "Missed shift yesterday, ran off the track, and then couldnt get the job done. Im going to have to step up." The race started a little more than an hour late, as NASCAR officials waited for a slightly damp track to dry out; the grooved rain tires are designed to work best in full wet conditions. Slightly heavier rain then began to fall just before the races halfway mark, causing the race to go under caution for a few laps before instructing teams to put on rain tires -- resulting in a rare test of NASCAR drivers skills in the rain. "It was ridiculous," Elliott said. "It really was. It was a handful." ' ' '


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